In Indonesia, breastfeeding impacts families, communities, and the economy.

There are serious health and economic consequences associated with not breastfeeding.

Globally, the World Health Assembly (WHA) has set a target to increase the exclusive breastfeeding rate to 50% by 2025. Indonesia has made commitments and taken important steps towards this benchmark. For example, the exclusive breastfeeding rate for children under six months increased 11 percentage points from 32% to 41% between 2007 and 2012. More, however, must be done to reach the WHA target.

 

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Indonesia facts

264+ million (M)

$1+ trillion (T)

41%
The global goal: All countries reach an exclusive rate of 50% by 2025.
Indonesia 41%
Global Goal: 50%
41%
50%
Annually, inadequate breastfeeding in Indonesia results in:
15,000+
preventable child deaths.

When a child is not breastfed, that child is less likely to survive. He or she is more likely to contract life-threatening illnesses and be less able to fight off sicknesses.

9M+
cases of diarrhea and pneumonia.

Children who are not breastfed are more likely to drink unclean water (in formula) and have less developed immune systems. This means they are more prone to contracting diarrhea-causing pathogens and pneumonia. The effects can be life-long.

$743M+
in household costs.

When a child is not breastfed, families need to purchase breastmilk substitutes like formula, which is costly, especially for families in low-and middle- income countries.

$85M+
in health care system treatment costs.

When children are not breastfed, both children and mothers are more likely to get sick and need to seek out treatment. This results in significant treatment costs for health systems.

The human costs of not breastfeeding in Indonesia

There are serious health consequences associated with not breastfeeding.

When children are not breastfed, they are at higher risk of illness and death. Later in life, mothers who do not breastfeed are more prone to develop life-altering and life-threatening cancers and Type II diabetes.

Impact of not breastfeeding on morbidity and mortality in:

 

Preventable cases Preventable Deaths
Diarrhea 9,044,515 3,861
Acute respiratory infections/pneumonia 306,200 11,167
Obesity 62,408 Not Available
Preventable cases Preventable Deaths
Breast cancer 4,524 947
Ovarian cancer 909 548
Type II diabetes 43,384 3,675
The economic costs of not breastfeeding in Indonesia

 

 

There are serious economic consequences to not breastfeeding.

Currently, Indonesia suffers economic losses because only 41% of children are exclusively breastfed. These economic losses are the result of:

  • Higher health systems costs, as children and mothers develop illnesses that could have been prevented by breastfeeding practices;
  • Lost productivity, as children who were not breastfed are less likely to fully develop and fully contribute to the economy, and;
  • Higher household expenditures, as families need to purchase breastmilk substitutes like formula when they do not breastfeed their children

Impact of not breastfeeding on:

 

In Indonesia, health systems incur costs when treating illnesses that could have been prevented by breastfeeding.

Type II diabetes in mothers $3,915,601
Diarrhea in children $75,873,575
Acute respiratory infection/pneumonia in children $5,236,816
Total in USD $85,025,991
Total as a % of Gross National Income (GNI) 0.010%

When families do not breastfeed their children, they need to purchase formula. This results in the following household costs.

In USD $743,491,699
Total as a % of nominal wages 9.900%
Select a GDP growth rate

The health of an economy impacts a child’s earning potential. Put simply, the earning potential of a child living in a country with a low GDP will be smaller than that of a child living in a country with a high GDP. As GDP grows, a child’s lifetime earning potential grows. Yet, inadequate breastfeeding can limit a child’s development and earning potential.

See how different rates of GDP growth impact costs of not breastfeeding

Make a selection below:

Economic losses in Indonesia due to inadequate breastfeeding when the country's GDP is growing at 0%

Currently, 41% of children are exclusively breastfed in Indonesia. Explore the data below to see how the economic losses of inadequate breastfeeding at this rate change as the GDP grows more quickly or slowly.

The cost of inadequate breastfeeding due to preventable deaths.

Child mortality $690,539,337
Maternal mortality $20,410,845
Combined child and maternal mortality $710,950,182
Total as % GNI 0.080%

The cost of inadequate breastfeeding due to cognitive losses

Total in USD$2,084,464,158
As a % GNI0.235%

The total cost of inadequate breastfeeding (combined health system, mortality, and cognitive losses)

Total in USD$2,880,440,332
As a % GNI0.325%

Economic losses in Indonesia due to inadequate breastfeeding when the country's GDP is growing at 3%

Currently, 41% of children are exclusively breastfed in Indonesia. Explore the data below to see how the economic losses of inadequate breastfeeding at this rate change as the GDP grows more quickly or slowly.

The cost of inadequate breastfeeding due to preventable deaths.

Child mortality $2,300,320,195
Maternal mortality $24,300,782
Combined child and maternal mortality $24,300,782
Total as % GNI 0.262%

The cost of inadequate breastfeeding due to cognitive losses

Total in USD$6,943,753,590
As a % GNI0.783%

The total cost of inadequate breastfeeding (combined health system, mortality, and cognitive losses)

Total in USD$9,353,400,559
As a % GNI1.054%

Economic losses in Indonesia due to inadequate breastfeeding when the country's GDP is growing at 5%

Currently, 41% of children are exclusively breastfed in Indonesia. Explore the data below to see how the economic losses of inadequate breastfeeding at this rate change as the GDP grows more quickly or slowly.

The cost of inadequate breastfeeding due to preventable deaths.

Child mortality $5,500,580,009
Maternal mortality $27,306,621
Combined child and maternal mortality $5,527,886,630
Total as % GNI 0.623%

The cost of inadequate breastfeeding due to cognitive losses

Total in USD$16,604,067,669
As a % GNI1.872%

The total cost of inadequate breastfeeding (combined health system, mortality, and cognitive losses)

Total in USD$22,216,980,290
As a % GNI2.505%

Economic losses in Indonesia due to inadequate breastfeeding when the country's GDP is growing at 7%

Currently, 41% of children are exclusively breastfed in Indonesia. Explore the data below to see how the economic losses of inadequate breastfeeding at this rate change as the GDP grows more quickly or slowly.

The cost of inadequate breastfeeding due to preventable deaths.

Child mortality $13,818,313,621
Maternal mortality $30,690,141
Combined child and maternal mortality $13,849,003,762
Total as % GNI 1.561%

The cost of inadequate breastfeeding due to cognitive losses

Total in USD$41,712,03,836
As a % GNI4.702%

The total cost of inadequate breastfeeding (combined health system, mortality, and cognitive losses)

Total in USD$55,646,033,590
As a % GNI6.273%

Economic losses in Indonesia due to inadequate breastfeeding when the country's GDP is growing at 10%

Currently, 41% of children are exclusively breastfed in Indonesia. Explore the data below to see how the economic losses of inadequate breastfeeding at this rate change as the GDP grows more quickly or slowly.

The cost of inadequate breastfeeding due to preventable deaths.

Child mortality $59,041,062,393
Maternal mortality $36,575,743
Combined child and maternal mortality $59,077,638,136
Total as % GNI 6.660%

The cost of inadequate breastfeeding due to cognitive losses

Total in USD$178,221,531,844
As a % GNI20.092%

The total cost of inadequate breastfeeding (combined health system, mortality, and cognitive losses)

Total in USD$237,384,195,972
As a % GNI26.762%
Next steps in Indonesia

For Indonesia to thrive at the family, community, and national levels, breastfeeding rates and practices must improve.

Building and sustaining momentum around breastfeeding requires effective policy advocacy and social behavior change that combines interpersonal communications, mass media, and community-level programming. Reliable and timely data on rates and behaviors is critical to inform an approach that positions us to achieve global breastfeeding goals.

Tools & Resources: Global

This tool can be used to help inform policy actions, such as those recommended by the Global Breastfeeding Collective.

 
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