Guide, Handout, Job aid

Feb 09 2022

code quick guide

A Quick Guide: The International Code of Marketing for Breast-milk Substitutes

Updated February 2022!

This quick guide summarizes the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes (The Code) and relevant resolutions of the World Health Assembly that help protect breastfeeding around the globe.

Announcement

Jun 01 2021

Special BMS Code resources collection

Alive & Thrive has launched a special collection of resources on the BMS Code, featuring resources from various organizations around the world.

Journal article

Dec 08 2020

Mistakes from the HIV pandemic should inform the COVID-19 response for maternal and newborn care (Gribble, K., 2020. International Breastfeeding Journal)

During the COVID-19 pandemic, policy makers and practitioners must learn from mistakes made during the HIV pandemic, when breastfeeding was undermined through isolating infants from their mothers, and formula feeding resulted in more infant deaths than the disease.

Handout

Apr 21 2020

burkina nutrition profiles

Burkina Faso Nutrition Profiles for Six Regions

These nutrition profiles present MIYCN data for six regions of Burkina Faso, including data on health and nutrition indicators, causes of undernutrition, nutrition promotion platforms and antenatal and child health care, and global nutrition targets.

Journal article

Feb 25 2020

The cost of not breastfeeding: global results from a new tool (Walters, D., 2019. Health Policy and Planning)

A billion dollars and two thousand lives, every day. This impactful study, which is the foundation for Alive and Thrive’s online tool, examines the human and economic costs of not breastfeeding.

Journal article

Feb 11 2020

Suboptimal infant and young child feeding practices in rural Boucle du Mouhoun, Burkina Faso: Findings from a cross-sectional population-based survey (Sarrasat S., 2019. PLoS One)

Mothers in the rural Boucle de Mouhoun Region of Burkina Faso had low levels of knowledge of IYCF and practices, according to this study: 60% of children had the minimum meal frequency, while only 18% benefited from the minimum dietary diversity and 13% received minimum acceptable diet.

 
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